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& Seasoning

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& Spices

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Edible Flowers

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EDIBLE FLOWERS
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This list of edible flowers attempts to describe their flavor and use.

Anise Hyssop – Sweet anise flavor, used on meats and in the herbes de Provence spice mix, & salads
Arugula – Roasted nutty flavor, used for spicy mesclun salad and on sandwiches
Bachelor Button – Lettuce type flavor, used for color in salads and ice cubes
Basil – Sweet anise flavor, used from appetizers to desserts
Bee Balm –Spicy mint flavor, used for its nectar and color in salads
Borage – Cucumber flavor, used for salads
Calendula – Slight bitter saffron flavor, used as a substitute for saffron
Chamomile – Light floral flavor, used for tea. (** Do not used if you have ragweed allergies)
Chives & Garlic Chives – Onion or garlic flavor, used as a substitute for garlic or onions
Chrysanthemum – Bitter floral flavor, used for tea
Coriander – Cilantro flavor, used as a garnish for salsa and tomatoes dishes
Daylily – Sweet lettuce flavor – great for salads and for under chicken & tuna salad
Dianthus – Sweet clove flavor, good in tea and desserts and jelly
Dill - Dill flavor, used for pickling.
Elderberry – Sweet berry flavor, fried and eaten like fritters
Fennel - Anise fennel flavor, used with sausage and in Italian dishes
Flowering Maple - Sweet lettuce flavor, used for salads and garnish
Fuchsia – Extremely bitter, used more for show than taste
Gladiolus – Vegetable flavor, used in cucumber or tomato salad
Grape Sage – Sweet grape herbal flavor, used for fruit salads
Greek Oregano – Oregano flavor, used on pizza and with sauces
Hibiscus – Mild citrus flavor, used for tea and salads
Honeysuckle – Sweet honey flavor, used in drinks
Impatiens – Sweet succulent flavor, used in salads and on desserts with fruit
Jasmine – Strong floral flavor, used in tea
Lavender – Sweet lavender flavor, used in herbes de Provence spice mix, cookies, chocolate, ice cream and drinks
Gem Marigold – Pungent tropical fruit flavor, used in salads
Marjoram – Sweet musky flavor, used in Polish sausage and teas
Mexican mint marigolds - Sweet spicy flavor; used in salads and garnish
Mint – Flavor of the particular mint (spearmint, peppermint, chocolate, lavender, lime, orange, apple or pineapple) used mostly for garnish
Mustard – Spicy flavor, used in salads.
Nasturtium – Spicy peppery flavor, used in salads
Orange Blossom – Orange citrus flavor, used in salads
Pansy – Vegetable flavor, used for its color in salads and ice cubes
Passion Flower –Sweet floral flavor, used for garnishes and cake decorations
Pea - Sweet pea flavor, great in salads
Pineapple Sage – Sweet pineapple flavor, used in BBQ and salads
Red Clover – Sweet clover flavor, used for nectar
Rose – Perfumed flavor, used for tea and salads and fruit
Rosemary – Rosemary flavor, used for meats and root vegetables
Safflower – Bitter flavor, used to dye food yellow/orange
Sage – Herbal flavor, used in tea and for garnish on meats
Snapdragon – Bitter endive flavor, used for fun
Squash Blossom – Vegetable flavor, stuffed, batter dipped and then fried and served as an appetizer.
Sunflower – Bittersweet flavor, used in salads
Stock – Floral flavor, used in decorations.
Thyme – Herbal flavor, used in meat and vegetable dishes and in desserts
Tuberous Begonia – Citrus flavor, used for garnish
Tulip – Beanlike flavor, used as a dish for salads
Viola- Vegetable flavor, used in salads and in ice and butter
Violet – Perfumed flavor, candied and used on desserts & cakes
Yucca – Sweet flavor, used in native Indian dishes and in soups and salads.
 

The seller has thoroughly researched which flowers are edible. However, individuals consuming the flowers, plants, or derivatives listed here do so entirely at their own risk. The seller can not be held responsible for any adverse reaction to the flowers.  Always consult with a qualified health-care professional for advice on the edibility of flowers, plants and the derivatives there from before eating.

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For additional information about Flowers, 
go to the on-line encyclopedia, courtesy of Wikipedia.

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Updated December 11, 2016